Primary tabs

Vertical Transport, Entrainment, and Scavenging Processes Affecting Trace Gases...

Cuchiara, G. C., A. Fried, M. C. Barth, M. Bela, C. Homeyer, B. Gaubert, J. G. Walega, P. Weibring, D. Richter, P. Wennberg, J. D. Crounse, M. Kim, G. S. Diskin, T. F. Hanisco, G. M. Wolfe, A. Beyersdorf, J. Peischl, I. B. Pollack, J. M. St. Clair, S. Woods, S. Tanelli, T. P. Bui, J. Dean-Day, L. G. Huey, and N. Heath (2020), Vertical Transport, Entrainment, and Scavenging Processes Affecting Trace Gases in a Modeled and Observed SEAC4RS Case Study, J. Geophys. Res., 125, doi:10.1029/2019JD031957.
Abstract: 

The convectively driven transport of soluble trace gases from the lower to the upper troposphere can occur on timescales of less than an hour, and recent studies suggest that microphysical scavenging is the dominant removal process of tropospheric ozone precursors. We examine the processes responsible for vertical transport, entrainment, and scavenging of soluble ozone precursors (formaldehyde and peroxides) for midlatitude convective storms sampled on 2 September 2013 during the Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) study. Cloud‐resolving simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model combined with aircraft measurements were performed to understand the effect of entrainment, scavenging efficiency (SE), and ice physics processes on these trace gases. Analysis of the observations revealed that the SEs of formaldehyde (43–53%) and hydrogen peroxide (~80–90%) were consistent between SEAC4RS storms and the severe convection observed during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) campaign. However, methyl hydrogen peroxide SE was generally smaller in the SEAC4RS storms (4%–27%) compared to DC3 convection. Predicted ice retention factors exhibit different values for some species compared to DC3, and we attribute these differences to variations in net precipitation production. The analyses show that much larger production of precipitation between condensation and freezing levels for DC3 severe convection compared to smaller SEAC4RS storms is largely responsible for the lower amount of soluble gases transported to colder temperatures, reducing the amount of soluble gases which eventually interact with cloud ice particles.

PDF of Publication: 
Download from publisher's website.
Research Program: 
Atmospheric Composition
Tropospheric Composition Program (TCP)
Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP)
Mission: 
SEAC4RS