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Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE

Hansen, J., M. Sato, R. Ruedy, P. Kharecha, A. Lacis, R. L. Miller, L. Nazarenko, K. Lo, G. A. Schmidt, G. Russell, I. Aleinov, S. E. Bauer, E. Baum, B. Cairns, V. Canuto, M. Chandler, Y. Cheng, A. Cohen, A. Del Genio, G. Faluvegi, E. Fleming, A. Friend, T. Hall, C. H. Jackman, J. Jonas, M. Kelley, N. Y. Kiang, D. Koch, G. Labow, J. Lerner, S. Menon, T. Novakov, V. Oinas, J. Perlwitz, J. Perlwitz, D. Rind, A. Romanou, R. Schmunk, D. Shindell, P. Stone, S. Sun, D. Streets, N. Tausnev, D. Thresher, N. Unger, M. Yao, and S. Zhang (2007), Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE, Clim. Dyn., 29, 661-696, doi:10.1007/s00382-007-0255-8.
Abstract: 

We carry out climate simulations for 1880– 2003 with GISS modelE driven by ten measured or estimated climate forcings. An ensemble of climate model runs is carried out for each forcing acting individually and for all forcing mechanisms acting together. We compare side-by-side simulated climate change for each forcing, all forcings, observations, unforced variability among model ensemble members, and, if available, observed variability. Discrepancies between observations and simuElectronic supplementary material The online version of this

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Research Program: 
Atmospheric Composition Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP)