Atmospheric composition change: Climate–Chemistry interactions

The core information for this publication's citation.: 
Isaksen, I. S. A., C. Granier, G. Myhre, T. K. Berntsen, S. B. Dalsøren, M. Gauss, Z. Klimont, R. Benestad, P. Bousquet, W. J. Collins, T. Cox, V. Eyring, D. Fowler, S. Fuzzi, P. Jöckel, P. Laj, U. Lohmann, M. Maione, P. Monks, A. S. H. Prevot, F. Raes, A. Richter, B. Rognerud, M. Schulz, D. Shindell, D. S. Stevenson, T. Storelvmo, W.-C. W. aa, M. V. bb, M. Wild, and D. W. C. Wuebbles (2009), Atmospheric composition change: Climate–Chemistry interactions, Atmos. Environ., 43, 5138-5192, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2009.08.003.
Abstract: 

Chemically active climate compounds are either primary compounds like methane (CH4), removed by oxidation in the atmosphere, or secondary compounds like ozone (O3), sulfate and organic aerosols, both formed and removed in the atmosphere. Man-induced climate–chemistry interaction is a two-way process: Emissions of pollutants change the atmospheric composition contributing to climate change through the aforementioned climate components, and climate change, through changes in temperature, dynamics, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric stability, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions, affects the atmospheric composition and oxidation processes in the troposphere. Here we present progress in our understanding of processes of importance for climate–chemistry interactions, and their contributions to changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. A key factor is the oxidation potential involving compounds like O3 and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Reported studies represent both current and

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Research Program: 
Atmospheric Composition Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP)
Modeling Analysis and Prediction Program (MAP)