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Trends in stratospheric ozone derived from merged SAGE II and Odin-OSIRIS...

Bourassa, A., D. A. Degenstein, W. Randel, J. M. Zawodny, E. Kyrölä, C. A. McLinden, C. E. Sioris, and C. Z. Roth (2014), Trends in stratospheric ozone derived from merged SAGE II and Odin-OSIRIS satellite observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 6983-6994, doi:10.5194/acp-14-6983-2014.
Abstract: 

Stratospheric ozone profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite instrument (1984–2005) are combined with those from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite (2001–Present) to quantify interannual variability and decadal trends in stratospheric ozone between 60◦ S and 60◦ N. These data are merged into a multi-instrument, long-term stratospheric ozone record (1984–present) by analyzing the measurements during the overlap period of 2002–2005 when both satellite instruments were operational. The variability in the deseasonalized time series is fit using multiple linear regression with predictor basis functions including the quasi-biennial oscillation, El Niño–Southern Oscillation index, solar activity proxy, and the pressure at the tropical tropopause, in addition to two linear trends (one before and one after 1997), from which the decadal trends in ozone are derived. From 1984 to 1997, there are statistically significant negative trends of 5–10 % per decade throughout the stratosphere between approximately 30 and 50 km. From 1997 to present, a statistically significant recovery of 3–8 % per decade has taken place throughout most of the stratosphere with the notable exception between 40◦ S and 40◦ N below approximately 22 km where the negative trend continues. The recovery is not significant between 25 and 35 km altitudes when accounting for a conservative estimate of instrument drift.

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Research Program: 
Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP)