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Uncertainties in Oceanic Radar Rain Maps at Kwajalein and Implications for...

Houze, R., S. Brodzik, C. Schumacher, S. E. Yuter, and C. R. Williams (2004), Uncertainties in Oceanic Radar Rain Maps at Kwajalein and Implications for Satellite Validation, J. Appl. Meteor., 43, 1114-1132.
Abstract: 

The Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) ground validation radar has provided a multiyear three-dimensional radar dataset at an oceanic site. Extensive rain gauge networks are not feasible over the ocean and, hence, are not available to aid in calibrating the radar or determining a conversion from reflectivity to rain rate. This paper describes methods used to ensure the calibration and allow the computation of quantitative rain maps from the radar data without the aid of rain gauges. Calibration adjustments are made by comparison with the TRMM satelliteborne precipitation radar. The additional steps required to convert the calibrated reflectivity to rain maps are the following: correction for the vertical profile of reflectivity below the lowest elevation angle using climatological convective and stratiform reflectivity profiles; conversion of reflectivity (Z ) to rain rate (R) with a relationship based on disdrometer data collected at Kwajalein, and a gap-filling estimate. The time series of rain maps computed by these procedures include low, best, and high estimates to frame the estimated overall uncertainty in the radar rain estimation. The greatest uncertainty of the rain maps lies in the calibration of the radar (Ϯ30%). The estimation of the low-altitude vertical profile of reflectivity is also a major uncertainty (Ϯ15%). The Z–R and data-gap uncertainties are relatively minor (Ϯ5% or less). These uncertainties help to prioritize the issues that need to be addressed to improve quantitative rainfall mapping over the ocean and provide useful bounds when comparing radar-derived rain estimates with other remotely sensed measures of oceanic rain (such as from satellite passive microwave sensors).